archaeology

What technology does to us?

Many of the discussions at this year's edition of the Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology CAA 2016 conference held earlier this week in Oslo were directly or somewhat less directly related to anxieties (and occasional optimism) about the impact of various types of technologies (and social arrangements related to technologies) on archaeological (information) work and practices.

The problem is to articulate for whom and how

The Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology conference was held this year  in Siena. Conference had gathered approximately 500 delegates and a very impressive number of papers, posters and roundtables. The book of abstracts was massive and reminded of proceedings volumes of the same conference from ten years ago.

Archaeologists and their information sources

I. Huvila, Archaeologists and their information sources, in Perspectives to Archaeological Information in the Digital Society, I. Huvila, Ed. Uppsala: Department of ALM, Uppsala University, 2014, pp. 25–54.

Introduction

I. Huvila, Introduction, in Perspectives to Archaeological Information in the Digital Society, I. Huvila, Ed. Uppsala: Department of ALM, Uppsala University, 2014, pp. 1–9.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - archaeology

Archaeology and Archaeological Information in the Digital Society shows how the digitization of archaeological information, tools and workflows, and their interplay with both old and new non-digital practices throughout the archaeological information process, affect the outcomes of archaeological work, and in the end, our general understanding of the human past.

Read more

Taking Health Information Behaviour into Account: implications of a neglected element for success- ful implementation of consumer health technologies on older adults (HIBA) is an Academy of Finland funded research project at Åbo Akademi University.

Read more

ARKDIS project maps the implications and opportunities of the digitalisation of information and information work in the domain of archaeology and to develop and evaluate conceptual and practical methods and procedures for enhancing archaeological information work in the digitalised environment.

Read more