Information specialists, knowledge management, information literacy -- and information

Yesterday, I had the opportunity to have an enjoyable discussion with Johanna Lahtinen about her doctoral thesis Information specialists’ roles and activities in collaborative development projects between education and working life: a case study of the formation of knowledge practices and innovative knowledge communities (summary is available in English) at her public viva. The thesis, written in Finnish, investigated the changing work and information practices of information specialists in the collaborative projects between educational institutions and industry. Apart from interesting and rich empirical insights, the Lahtinen's theoretical framework that combines information literacy and knowledge management is interesting and she makes insightful remarks that will be undoubtedly useful in developing this particular approach further.

Archaeology and Archaeological Information in the Digital Society shows how the digitization of archaeological information, tools and workflows, and their interplay with both old and new non-digital practices throughout the archaeological information process, affect the outcomes of archaeological work, and in the end, our general understanding of the human past.

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COST-ARKWORK is a network funded by the COST scheme that brings together the multidisciplinary work of researchers of archaeological practices in the field of archaeological knowledge production and use. The aim of the network is to make a major push forward in the current state-of-the-art in knowing how archaeological knowledge is produced, how it is used and how to maximise its positive impact in the society.

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CApturing Paradata for documenTing data creation and Use for the REsearch of the future (CAPTURE) investigates what information about the creation and use of research data that is paradata) is needed and how to capture enough of that information to make the data reusable in the future. 

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